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Voiceof theMembership
Isholisticmanagement important?
CONSERVATION INACTION
April 2016 IssueNo. 7
BensonTomboPiroris
Chairman,KantanaHolistic
management committee
Holisticmanagement isvery important
since the concept is all about having
good land management practices.
It has brought about peaceful co-
existence of the local communities
and ranchers. I would say that it is a
platform and also an opportunity to
learn about conservation.
Jibriel Legei
MemberMakurian group ranch
I would say it is very important as it
greatly assists in reducing soil erosion
and at the same time helps in claiming
“waste land”, transforming it into
productive land to benefit our entire
community, creating a positive impact
on our pastoral lifestyles.
Mzee JohnsonKinyaga
Member,Makurian group ranch
Since keeping livestock is the core
economic activity for our entire com-
munity, overgrazing has affected our
lands and during dry spells we have
suffered huge losses in terms of ani-
mal deaths. The practice has demon-
strated that keeping the right flocks
that canbe sustained and supportedby
our lands is very crucial. The practice
has reduced the number of people tak-
ing care of flocks hence making the
community more productive in other
ways.
Mzee JohnsonKinyaga
Member,Makuriangroup ranch
Since keeping livestock is the core
economic activity for our entire
community, overgrazing has affected
our lands and during dry spells we
have suffered huge losses in terms
of animal deaths. The practice
has demonstrated that keeping the
right flocks that can be sustained
and supported by our lands is very
crucial. The practice has reduced the
number of people taking careof flocks
hence making the community more
productive inotherways.
Josphat Lekuye
Member, Makurian group ranchers
and chairman Nyumba kumi
Osinoni village
First and foremost the practice has
helped us in the local community have
a fulfilling relationshipwith our neigh-
bours the ranchers as they allow us to
graze on their lands during dry sea-
sons.Thepracticehas alsohelpedus to
cope with the dry spells and also has
increasedour produce such asmilk and
meat.
SusanLegei
Member, holisticmanagement
committeeAljijo
It is important as the practice brings
people and their flocks together
creating a platform for us to cross-
breed our livestock. Grazing in one
area for some time helps to generate
“new grass” in another area hence
having enough grass for all of us.
SimonMunyariti
Resident,Makurian
When the idea was first introduced,
“we” the youths of Makurian benefit-
ed. Some of us were recruited into the
project to educate the community on
the importance of holisticmanagement
through dramas and participatory bara-
zas. The practice has also informed the
community on better “grazing plans”,
how to reduce soil erosion and gener-
ally how to increase unity in our com-
munity.
PeterNepukori
Farmerandmember,Osinoni
holisticmanagement committee
It is imperative that the practice is
continued since it helps us claimmore
land to graze our livestock and when
practicing it we reduce the amount
of erosion on our lands. It has also
helpedus dealwith insecurity cases as
currently all our flocks are been cared
for by the entire community, which
enhances good relations.
SambuatiKimili
Chairman, lowerMakurian
Holisticmanagement committee
Holistic land management practices
have shown us the need for keeping
sustainable herd of animals, taking
care of our environment and having
ways to regenerate grass for our
flocks. Thepracticehas also conveyed
long sought unity inour communityas
we see familiescome together tograze
and also topreserve our environment.
Mzee JohnsonKinyaga
Member,Makurian group ranch
Since keeping livestock is the core
economic activity for our entire
community, overgrazing has affected
our lands and during dry spells we
have suffered huge losses in terms
of animal deaths. The practice
has demonstrated that keeping the
right flocks that can be sustained
and supported by our lands is very
crucial. The practice has reduced the
number of people taking careof flocks
hence making the community more
productive in otherways.
Livesof Laikipia
Geoffrey Chege
“I always knew that I wanted to work in conservation, and that is why my
studies had to involve some aspect of conservation andWildlifeManagement.
After completing my education, I was lucky enough to get an internship with
Earthwatch, which eventually led me to the Lewa Wildlife Conservancy. I
think of how young I was when I started out and sometimes I laugh tomyself
because I was so green- only 23- and yet to this day I have never thought of
leaving! I am now the Conservancy’s Conservation and Wildlife Manager. I
oversee the research andmonitoring of all wildlife and their habitats on Lewa
and the greater conservation area. I am also part of a team implementing the
conservation education programme. It is fun and exciting interacting with
young learners who also want to be involved in conservation. One of themost
amazing projects I have worked on so far was a team effort assisting Lewa to
attain itsUNESCOWorldHeritageStatus in2013and the IUCNGreenListing
the following year. Lewa is one of only two conservancies inAfrica to receive
this honourable designation. Words cannot explain how proud I was! But I
do not want to give the impression that such things happen easily. There have
been many challenges getting to this point. There were times when I thought
that I would not be able to achieve half of the things I set out to do, such as
reintroducing black rhinos to previously inhabited areas. I am amember of the
AfricanRhino Specialist Group, and it makes me proud- it makes me strive to
encourage young people who visit the conservancy to stick to their dreams no
matter howhard the journey.”
F
ormal conservation
education inKenya
started in 1966when thefirst
education centerwas established
inNairobi. The creation of the
education centerwas inspired by
theNairobiAnimalOrphanage,
which became operational in
1964 (KWS 1996). Itwas at the
orphanage that school children
could come close to orphaned
animals and learnmore about
them from their carers. Since
thenConservationEducation
has grown significantly, with
Laikipia leading theway through
organisations such as the
NorthernKenyaConservation
Clubs supported byLWF and
MpalaResesarchCentre. The
natural resources found in
Laikipia are second to none, and
that iswhy it is essential that
residents, starting from an early
age, understand the importance
of conserving and protecting
natural resources for their
quality and sustainability.Young
learners inLaikipia benefit from
avid conservation enthusiasts
who havemade it theirmission
to empower youngminds. Meet
GeoffreyChege....
1,2,3,4 6,7,8
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