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CONSERVATION INACTION
February2016 IssueNo. 5
ConservationEducation inLaikipia
set tobenefit from formationof strongpartnerships
Studentsat a filmscreeningonwildlife
Awallmural replicating theagentsof
changeatSweetwatersPrimarySchool
Aposter supportedbyLWF,OPCand
RuffordFoundationwith the theMakeA
Choiceonsustainableenergy
T
he use of film to
educate young minds
is a technique that
conservation
education
has
taken advantage of for years.
In partnership with Ol Pejeta
Conservancy (OPC) and the
Rufford
Foundation,
LWF
continued toenhanceConservation
Education using nature based
films, hosting screenings for
students in various local schools
and communities living adjacent
to theConservancy.
The idea behind the venture
was to increase the level of
understanding about wildlife,
their respective habitats, wildlife
conservation and management
of how to improve community
participation. It is hoped that
the venture will trigger an
eagerness to participate inwildlife
management activities as well as
increase appreciation for the care
of other natural resources.
Communities that live in
and around OPC do so in an
ecosystem where wildlife thrives,
but have limited knowledge on
the management of the natural
resources.
By
introducing
creative awareness on wildlife
conservation and other activities
such as tree planting in schools,
community areas and homesteads
can be transformed and assist in
keeping the landscape intact for
future generations.
In addition, creating open
spaces in schools and at
surrounding
trading
centres
has ignited artistic expression
through murals on building walls
continues and has stirred interest
inwildlifemanagement, helping to
strengthen existing environmental
clubs andnetworks.
The
Rufford
Foundation,
formerly the Rufford Maurice
Laing Foundation, is a trust
based in the United Kingdom
that funds nature conservation
projects by small or medium-
sized organizations in developing
countries. The Foundation funded
the
Conservation
Education
Outreach Project
initiated in
February 2015 through a small
Grant. Over the years the project
has continued to achieve its aim
and objectives.
There
have
been
notable
achievements and successes since
the commencement of the project
such as:
• An increase in active and
responsive
audiences’
from primary schools and
surrounding community.
• Meeting the budget costs for
activities.
• Continued support from the
implementing
team
an
organisations;
The initial stage of the proj-
ect involved setting up a support
network with key organisations
such as African Environmental
Film Foundation (AEFF) and
Laikipia Wildlife Forum (LWF).
AEFF donated 25 environmental
themed films and documentaries
to the project giving easy access
to schools and other academic in-
stitutions within Laikipia through
the establishedLWF network. The
project was then introduced to
teachers attending environmental
education workshops organised
by LWF while OPC did the same
for local communities. In January
2016, the project was introduced
to environmental educators from
the larger Laikipia region during a
10day trainingworkshopon envi-
ronmental education held inOPC.
Project contribution and
outcomes
• The conservation education
outreach
schedules
have
created opportunities to reach
out towider target audiences in
remote areas.
• Through the nature based
films, school going children
and members of the local
communities have had a
chance to visually experience
wildlife, their behaviours and
their natural habitats increasing
their awareness about wildlife
conservation.
• Through local community
barazas, conservation issues
have been discussed especial-
ly those that address human-
wildlife conflict.
The project did face various chal-
lenges during its implementation,
some ofwhichwere;
• Manoeuvring a challenging
road network during the rainy
season causing slight delays in
the activities schedule.
• Lack of information on
conservation and use of
Swahili translatedfilms.
• Set public school curricular
proved to be inflexible to the
introduction of the project,
restricting the number of
studentswhoparticipated in the
project.
LWF will continue to work with
the Rufford Foundation, OPC and
other key stakeholders in enhanc-
ing Conservation Education for
local, national and international
audiences, aswell as look forways
to ensure a sustainable model for
Conservation Education in Laiki-
pia is implemented.
Over 115 teams participated in thefirst ever national count ofGrevy’s zebras by citizen scientists. Thank you to all thosewho participated and supported theGreatGrevy’sRally.
Until the next time!
ALaikipiaCounty team is joinedbyothercitizenscientistsatMpala
ResearchCentreduring theGreatGrevy’sRally
MarwellWildifeconductedanaerial surveyof Grevy’s
zebraat the rally
PrimarySchool childrensignedupascitizenscientists
TheGreatGrevy’sRally:Abigwin forLaikipiaandKenya’sNorthernTerritories
DanRubenstein trainsCitizenScientistsat the rally’s
registration
LWF’sExecutiveDirector, PeterHetz, is joinedbyCounty representative to
adress themediaandCitizenScientistsat the registrationpoint
1,2 4,5,6,7,8
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